The Yonaguni Monument

by | Jan 8, 2021 | Mystery

Manmade Monument or natural geological formation?

The Yonaguni Monument

The Yonaguni Monument, is a submerged rock formation off the coast
of Yonaguni, the southernmost island in Japan. It lies approximately a
hundred kilometres east of Taiwan.
Marine geologist Masaaki Kimura claims that the formations are man-made
stepped monoliths.

The Yonaguni Monument

It was discovered in the mid-1980s near Yonaguni Island, Japan. While some
believe the ziggurat-like formation is from an ancient city, others argue that
it was naturally created.

Yonaguni island

The Yonaguni Monument

The rectangular monument, which was first detected by a scuba diver, is
more than 165 feet (50 metres) long and some 65 feet (20 metres) wide. A
number of scholars have visited the site, but its origin remains uncertain.

Location near Yonaguni island marked

The Yonaguni Monument

According to some, the monument is a man-made stepped pyramid. In
addition to many straight lines, some of the rocks purportedly have carvings.
Nearby are other formations, suggesting a submerged ancient city. This
theory contends that the structures are at least 5,000 years old

The Yonaguni Monument

What makes scientists believe that the monument is more than just a giant
piece of rock is the variety of details that point to human influence. There
are what looks like couple of pillars, a stone column, a wall that is 33 feet
wide, a road, and even a star-shaped platform

The Yonaguni Monument

Kimura believes they date back at least 5,000 years due to evidence in
underwater caves he found while diving around the monument. He also
claims to be researching a relief on the site that has a painting of what
resembles a cow.

The noticeable “star platform”

The Yonaguni Monument

In 1986, while looking for a place to observe sharks, Kihachiro Aratake,
director of Yonaguni-Cho Tourism Association,noticed singular seabed
formations resembling architectural structures. Shortly, scientists directed by the
University of Ryūkyūvisited the formations.

The Yonaguni Monument

The formation has since become a relatively popular attraction for divers
despite strong currents.
It is composed of medium to very fine sandstones and mudstone
“believed to have been deposited” about 20 million years ago.

Kimura first estimated that the monument must be at least 10,000 years old
(8,000 BCE), dating it to a period when it would have been above water, and
therefore surmised that the site may be a remnant of the mythical lost
continent of Mu.

The Yonaguni Monument

There is ample evidence that monument is human made. Some of the rock’s
details seem too exact and precise for natural methods, like a trench that
features two 90 degree angles, two megaliths with straight edges, sharp
corners. Erosion usually leads to softened and curved edges.

The Yonaguni Monument

The point of absence of loose blocks on the flat areas is expected if they
were formed solely by natural erosion and fracturing. Robert Schoch, who
believes the monument was formed geologically, has noted that the rocks are
swept with strong currents.

The Yonaguni Monument

Supporters of artificial origin, such as writer Graham Hancock, argue that
while many of the features seen at Yonaguni are also seen in natural
sandstone formations throughout the world, the concentration of so many
peculiar formations in such a small area is highly unlikely.

The Yonaguni Monument

Despite its ever-growing popularity and the mystery that surrounds it, the
Yonaguni Monument has never been recognized by the Japanese Agency for
Cultural Affairs or the government of Okinawa Prefecture as an important
historical artifact. More research still needs to be done

The Yonaguni Monument

YouTube link to History channels documentary:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=TiMuX9YJfao

‘map’ of the monument

The Yonaguni Monument